Need a little break from the chaos of the world? You're in the right place! Take a moment to pause and rest your eyes on some smile-inducing art.

Bird Art on Wood – Ostrich

Bird Art on Wood – Ostrich

$44.00$55.00

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The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed and numbered on the back (the edition # you receive will vary).Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back. Watermarks will not appear on print.

To get the three at a discounted price, visit this link.

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Additional information

Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original bird painting called “Her Smile Will Fool You.”

This ostrich might look sweet, but don’t let those lashes distract you. She means business.

About the bird:

From our friends at the African Wildlife Federation:

The ostrich is the largest bird in the world. It is flightless and relies on strong legs with two clawed toes used for running and kicking. Males are black with white wings and tail feathers, while females are brownish-gray.

  • Native to more than 25 African countries
  • Ostriches’ eyes are inches across
  • Eggs can weigh pounds

Ostriches are popular in the fashion world.

In the 18th century, ostrich feathers were so popular in ladies’ fashion that the ostrich disappeared from all of North Africa. If not for ostrich farming, which began in 1838, the ostrich would probably be extinct. Today, ostriches are farmed and hunted for feathers, skin, meat, eggs, and fat—which, in Somalia, is believed to cure AIDS and diabetes.

Humans are encroaching on ostrich habitats.

As human populations grow, they expand into areas where wildlife once roamed freely. The construction of settlements and roads and agricultural cultivation all contribute to habitat loss.