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Tree Swallow – Bird Art Print on Wood

Tree Swallow – Bird Art Print on Wood

$44.00$55.00

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About the Bird Art:

The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed on the back. Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back. Watermarks will not appear on print. Color may vary (based on your monitor settings).

Available sizes:

  • 4″x4″
  • 6″x6″

See more below.

Additional information

Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original painting of a Tree Swallow called, “Tonight I Still Dream of You.”

As blue as the sky or a teal ocean, this beautiful swallow zips around the skies like a laser beam. I really enjoyed building up the layers. Lots of tiny brush strokes went into this painting to create the shimmering quality of the feathers.

Bird in a Box subscribers: this is the bird for March 2020.

See the painting come together

About the Tree Swallow

from AllAboutBirds.org:

Cool Facts

  • Migrating and wintering Tree Swallows can form enormous flocks numbering in the hundreds of thousands. They gather about an hour before sunset and form a dense cloud above a roost site (such as a cattail marsh or grove of small trees), swirling around like a living tornado. With each pass, more birds drop down until they are all settled on the roost.
  • Tree Swallows winter farther north than any other American swallows and return to their nesting grounds long before other swallows come back. They can eat plant foods as well as their normal insect prey, which helps them survive the cold snaps and wintry weather of early spring.
  • The Tree Swallow—which is most often seen in open, treeless areas—gets its name from its habit of nesting in tree cavities. They also take readily to nest boxes.
  • Tree Swallows have helped researchers make major advances in several branches of ecology, and they are among the best-studied bird species in North America. Still, we know little about their lives during migration and winter.

Range Map of the Tree Swallow

Range map provided by Birds of North America