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Western Meadowlark – Art Print on Wood

Western Meadowlark – Art Print on Wood

$44.00$55.00

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The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed and numbered on the back (the edition # you receive will vary).Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back. Watermarks will not appear on print.

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Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original painting of a Western Meadlowlark called “A Mighty Fine Day.”

This Western Meadowlark is a sweet little fellow, always on the look out for a ray of sunshine. The print is mounted on wood and ready to hang. Bird in a Box subscribers – this is the bird for November 2015.

 

About the bird:

From our friends at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology:

“The buoyant, flutelike melody of the Western Meadowlark ringing out across a field can brighten anyone’s day. Meadowlarks are often more easily heard than seen, unless you spot a male singing from a fence post. This colorful member of the blackbird family flashes a vibrant yellow breast crossed by a distinctive, black, V-shaped band. Look and listen for these stout ground feeders in grasslands, meadows, pastures, and along marsh edges throughout the West and Midwest, where flocks strut and feed on seeds and insects.

“Western Meadowlarks seek the wide open spaces of native grasslands and agricultural fields for spring and summer breeding and winter foraging. Look for them among low to medium-height grasses more so than in tall fields. They also occur along the weedy verges of roads, marsh edges, and mountain meadows up to 10,000 feet.”