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Wilson’s Warbler – Bird Art Print on Wood

Wilson’s Warbler – Bird Art Print on Wood

$44.00$55.00

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About the Bird Art:

The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed, titled, and numbered on the back.

Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back.

Watermarks will not appear on print. Color may vary (based on your monitor settings).

Available sizes:

  • 4″x4″
  • 6″x6″

See more below.

Additional information

Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original painting of a Wilson’s Warbler titled, “Hello, Sunshine!”

Wilson’s warblers are regular visitors to my backyard. Seeing these bright tiny birds is always a treat! Their yellow bodies practically glow. And those silly little black hats the males wear crack me up.

 

About the Wilson's Warbler

From The Cornell Lab of Ornithology:

Wilson’s Warblers dance around willow and alder thickets, often near water, to the rapid beat of their chattering song. This bright yellow warbler with a black cap is one of the smallest warblers in the U.S. and among the most recognizable. They rarely slow down, dashing between shrubs, grabbing insects from one leaf after another, and popping up on low perches to sing. Wilson’s Warblers breed in mountains and northern forests, but pass through every state in the lower 48 during migration—so be on the lookout when they are on the move in the spring and fall.

 

Fun facts:

Wilson’s Warblers tend to be brighter yellow in the West and paler yellow in the East. Pacific Coast populations have the brightest yellow, almost orange, foreheads and faces. Rocky Mountain and Alaskan birds also tend to be slightly larger than the Eastern and Pacific Coast populations.

The oldest recorded Wilson’s Warbler was a male, and at least 8 years, 11 months, when he was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in California in 2008. He had been banded in the same state in 2000.

Wilson’s Warblers do not visit feeders, but you can provide habitat for them in your yard by landscaping with native trees and shrubs. Creating a bird-friendly backyard for Wilson’s Warblers even if they are not breeding in your area may help them out during migration.

Range Map of the Wilson's Warbler

Range Map by Birds of the World