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Red-Breasted Sapsucker – Bird Art Print on Wood

Red-Breasted Sapsucker – Bird Art Print on Wood

$44.00$55.00

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About the Bird Art:

The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed, titled, and numbered on the back.

Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back.

Watermarks will not appear on print. Color may vary (based on your monitor settings).

Available sizes:

  • 4″x4″
  • 6″x6″

See more below.

Additional information

Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original painting of a Red-breasted Sapsucker titled, “I Only See Stars When I See You.”

The reference photo I used for this handsome fellow was taken in San Francisco by David Assmann. Such a striking bird, right?

Bird in a Box subscribers: this is the bird for February 2021.

Watch the Painting Come Together

About the Red-breasted Sapsucker

from AllAboutBirds.org:

A tiny bird seemingly overflowing with energy, the Ruby-crowned Kinglet forages almost frantically through lower branches of shrubs and trees. Its habit of constantly flicking its wings is a key identification clue. Smaller than a warbler or chickadee, this plain green-gray bird has a white eyering and a white bar on the wing. Alas, the male’s brilliant ruby crown patch usually stays hidden—your best chance to see it is to find an excited male singing in spring or summer.

  • The Red-breasted Sapsucker has two subspecies. The northern form, resident from Alaska to Oregon, is redder on the head and has less white on the back. The southern form, found in California, often shows the black and white face striping of the other sapsucker species, but all the facial feathers are tipped in red.
  • Hummingbirds of several species make use of sapsucker feeding holes and come to rely on them. The Rufous Hummingbird is closely associated with the Red-breasted Sapsucker. It nests near sap wells and may follow the woodpecker around during the day, feeding at the wells the sapsucker keeps flowing.

Range Map of the Red-breasted Sapsucker

Range map by Birds of North America