Need a little break from the chaos of the world? You're in the right place! Take a moment to pause and rest your eyes on some smile-inducing art.

Bird on Wood – Grey Jay

Bird on Wood – Grey Jay

$44.00$55.00

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About the Bird Art:

The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed and numbered on the back (the edition # you receive will vary).Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back. Watermarks will not appear on print.

To get the three at a discounted price, visit this link.

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Additional information

Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original bird painting called “I Told You So.”

This little bird is feeling snarky. He knows its best to just keep it to himself, but he can’t.

About the bird:

From our friends of Audubon:

Conservation status Most of breeding range is not subject to human disturbance. Has declined in a few areas after clearcutting of forest.
Family Crows, Magpies, Jays
Habitat Spruce and fir forests. Found in various kinds of coniferous and mixed forest, but rarely occurs where there are no spruce trees. Habitats include black spruce bogs in eastern Canada, forests of aspen and Engelmann spruce in Rockies, Sitka spruce and Douglas-fir on northwest coast.
A hiker in the north woods sometimes will be followed by a pair of Gray Jays, gliding silently from tree to tree, watching inquisitively. These fluffy jays seem fearless, and they can be a minor nuisance around campsites and cabins, stealing food, earning the nickname “camp robber.” Tough enough to survive year-round in very cold climates, they store excess food in bark crevices all summer, retrieving it in harsh weather. Surprisingly, they nest and raise their young in late winter and early spring, not during the brief northern summer.