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Bird Art on Wood – Long-eared Owl

Bird Art on Wood – Long-eared Owl

$44.00$55.00

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The image is printed on Epson Premium Matte Paper with UltraChrome Ink; the color should last quite a long time. The print is then mounted on a cradled wood block and coated with a UV resistant protectant to prevent fading. Each block is signed and numbered on the back (the edition # you receive will vary).Ready to hang from a sawtooth hanger attached to the back. Watermarks will not appear on print.

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Bird Art

4" x 4": $44, 6" x 6": $55

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This listing is for a limited edition, fine art print of my original bird painting called “Surely You Jest?!”

The expression on this Long-Eared Owl’s face makes me giggle quite a bit.

About the bird:

Conservation status Status not well known; local numbers rise and fall, but some surveys and migration counts suggest that overall population in North America is declining. Loss of habitat may be part of cause.
Family Owls
Habitat Woodlands, conifer groves. Favored habitat includes dense trees for nesting and roosting, open country for hunting. Inhabits a wide variety of such settings, including forest with extensive meadows, groves of conifers or deciduous trees in prairie country, streamside groves in desert. Generally avoids unbroken forest.
Migration

Some withdrawal in winter from northern part of breeding range, and some movement south into southeastern United States and Mexico, but species is found year-round in many regions. May be nomadic at times, moving about in response to changing food supplies.

This medium-sized owl is widespread but not particularly well known in North America. It seems to call less often or less conspicuously than many of our other owls, so it may be overlooked in some areas where it nests. In winter, sometimes groups of a dozen or more may be found roosting together in groves of conifers, willows, mesquites, or other trees.